World's Largest and Tallest Wooden Houses

World's Largest Tree House - 6000 Square Feet

In 2005, the world’s largest all-wood treehouse was built amongst the lime trees of the Alnwick Garden in Northumberland County, UK. Alnwick Gardens can be reached from the A1 approximately 50 miles north of Newcastle. This 6,000 square foot treehouse is comprised of walkways, cottages, shops, a restaurant, and play areas. There is an expansive deck area and rope bridge loop behind the house, all of which can be accessed by wheelchair.

World's Tallest Wooden House - 13 Floors and 144ft High

Dominating the skyline of Arkhangelsk, a city in Russia's far north-west, it is believed to be the world's tallest wooden house, soaring 13 floors to reach 144ft - about half the size of the tower of Big Ben.

The house that Nikolai Sutyagin built is also crumbling, incomplete and under threat of demolition from city authorities determined to end the former convict's eccentric 15-year project.

When Sutyagin began work on his dacha in 1992, he claims he was only intending to build a two-storey house - larger than those of his neighbours to reflect his position as the city's richest man, but certainly not a contender for the Guinness Book of Records.

However, convinced by a trip to see wooden houses in Japan and Norway, he concluded that he had not used roof space efficiently enough and decided to keep building.

"First I added three floors but then the house looked ungainly, like a mushroom," he said. "So I added another and it still didn't look right so I kept going. What you see today is a happy accident."

There were other motives too. Having grown up in a Soviet communal flat, Sutyagin said he felt lonely living by himself.

Not only would his house make a perfect love nest for his molls, it could also accommodate the 18 executives at his construction company.

What is left of his fantasy is slowly decaying around him. Even so, it remains a remarkable architectural feat - especially given the fact that Sutyagin built much of it himself - that defies easy description.

A whimsical jumble of planking, from a distance it bears a resemblance to a Japanese pagoda, but draw closer and it seems more like a mix between a Brobdignagian tree house and the lair of a wicked fairytale character.

The Telegraph UK